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Frequently Asked Questions
General Information
What is the Briar Creek Sewer System Improvement Project?
Why is the sewer system improvement project necessary?
What is the Briar Creek basin?
At what stage is the project?
Will the City want to buy an easement from me?
How much will the project cost?
Are other city projects being coordinated with the Briar Creek project?
How can property owners along Briar Creek and the public learn more about the project?
Will there be community meetings?
Who should I contact if I have a question about the project?

Construction
Where will improvements be constructed? When will it start?
Will traffic be impacted?
Will my water or sewer services be disrupted during construction?
How will area be restored?



General Information
What is the Briar Creek Sewer System Improvement Project?                   (back)


The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Utility Department (CMUD) project will improve the existing wastewater system along Briar Creek from the Sugar Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant (near the intersection of Park and Tyvola roads) to the W.T. Harris/The Plaza area. (See map)


Why is the sewer system improvement project necessary?                          (back)

The project is driven by the need to improve the effectiveness of a sewer system worn by age, high usage, and natural and man-made obstructions. Improvements will increase sanitary sewer capacity to meet current and future needs. These pipes will reduce the risk of sewer overflows and protect water quality in Briar Creek.

The sanitary sewer system serving the Briar Creek basin depends on pipelines installed at different times during the past 80 years. Parallel pipelines - one on each side of the creek - exist along most of the route. They range in size from 12 inches to 72 inches in diameter with a total length of nearly 100,000 linear feet (about 19 miles). The condition and capacity of these existing pipelines are not able to provide the level of service required by CMUD, new state laws and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).


What is the Briar Creek basin?                                                                          (back)

The Briar Creek basin is the area of land that drains into Briar Creek or one of its tributaries. Sewer systems are designed around drainage basins because, in general, they work by gravity. Pipelines are typically buried along creeks, the lowest point in the basin, to take advantage of gravity to move the wastewater through the pipes to the treatment plant.


At what stage is the project?                                                                              (back)

The first phase is complete and second phase is under construction. Phase three is being designed.

CMUD and consulting engineers CDM-Smith studied the condition of existing pipelines, monitored wastewater flows in wet and dry weather, and have evaluated various techniques and options to improve the sewer system.

Will the City want to buy an easement from me?                                               
(back)

Many easements in phase two already exist although the areas may be overgrown or are being used by property owners as part of their private property.

On phase three, It will be necessary to acquire additional right of way easements from some properties along the route. City representatives will individually contact every property owner from which an easement is needed.


How much will the project cost?                                                                            (back)

For engineering, design and construction services, phase 2 of the Briar Creek project is expected to cost approximately $20 million. This project and all CMUD capital improvement projects are funded with water and sewer user fees paid by current customers. CMUD does not receive city or county tax dollars.


Are other city projects being coordinated with the Briar Creek project?              (back)

To create efficiencies and reduce impact to citizens, every effort is being made to coordinate construction with other city projects along Briar Creek.

How can property owners along Briar Creek and the public learn more about the project(back)

Property owners and the public can learn about project progress by regularly visiting the project's Web site, signing up to receive the project newsletter by e-mail, and attending community meetings that will be announced through the local media and on this Web site.  


Will there be community meetings?                                                                                        (back)
Yes. The next public meeting is focusing on neighborhoods from Commonwealth Avenue through Country Club Drive.

Date: Tuesday, May 29, drop in between 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.

Location: Commonwealth United Methodist Church at 2434 Commonwealth Avenue 


When community workshops are scheduled, details will be posted on this website, emailed to subscribers, and mailed to residents and businesses in the project area. Public meetings have been held in 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011 and 2012. 

Who should I contact if I have a question about the project?                                               (back)

For questions about the Briar Creek sewer system improvement project, call the 311 or 704-336-7600.


Construction

Where will improvements be constructed?When will it start?                                               (back)

Improvements will be constructed within easement areas in the vicinity of existing wastewater pipelines along Briar Creek. Activity is expected to be noticeable on both sides of the creek along the entire route.

Construction will take place in three phases.

Phase I (Complete):  Sugar Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant near Tyvola and Park roads to north of Randolph Road (Improvements fall on the east side of creek from south of Tyvola Road to north of Park Road; the west side of the creek north of Park Road to north of Runnymede Lane; and on both sides of the creek from Runnymede to Randolph Road except where they are located only on the west side (about one-half mile north and south of Providence Road and one-half mile north of Colony Road).

Phase II (Under Construction):  Randolph Road to north of Country Club Drive (Improvements are planned to begin north of Randolph Road on the east side of the creek and then move to west side of the creek from middle of the medical park, under Independence Boulevard and then move to east side and west side befofe Country Club Drive.)

Phase III (In Design):  South of Country Club Drive to the W.T. Harris/The Plaza area (Improvements will be constructed on both sides of the creek and existing wastewater pipelines. Many improvements will be built on the east or south side of Briar Creek from Quiet Cove Court (near The Plaza/W.T. Harris area) to immediately south of Shamrock Drive, from Shamrock Drive to the south side of Country Club Drive, most improvements will be constructed on the west side of the creek.)


How will I get around during construction?                                                                                    (back) 


The existing sewer lines are built along Briar Creek so the majority of the work will not impact roadways. When the pipe improvements must cross a street, engineers have planned for many of the major thoroughfares to be tunneled so traffic is not disrupted. However, some traffic control measures will be in place for the following areas: Randolph Road/East 7th Street, Colonnade Drive, Morningside Drive, Masonic Drive and Country Club Drive.

Traffic in both directions will be maintained in these areas and traffic flaggers will help guide traffic through the area.

Will my water or sewer services be disrupted during construction
?                                             (back)

Disruptions to water and/or sewer services are not expected. If it becomes necessary to plan a service disruption, affected customers will be notified in advance.

How will area be restored?
After the sewer line is activated, contractors will complete final restoration along the route to repair areas disturbed during activation. This includes:

  • Grading the soil
  • Reseeding grass / applying straw mulch
  • Installing permanent fencing that was removed for construction
  • Restoring creek banks