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About
BLE 9th Street Station

Charlotte’s past textile industry influenced Anna Valentina Murch and Douglas Hollis' design of the station canopies. Their design, to be fabricated using a technologically advanced tensile membrane, will  culminate in an airy, dynamic gateway to the extension, replete with undulating lines and a permeating brightness through use of white and blue.

9th Street Station Canopy Rendering - Bird's Eye View 
 
 
This signature station will serve as a place of demarcation, where riders enter into the movement of this addition to the transit system. The significance of the site manifests in the many components that define the space, through elemental responses to environmental weather conditions, qualities of light on the site, and the movement of the transit line. The waiting passenger will be enveloped by a series of components orchestrated to create a collectively uplifting experience.

BIRD EYES2.jpg

Each of the ten membranes will sit atop a white painted steel structure, providing shelter and allowing penetration of soft, diffused light.  After the sun goes down, the internally lit canopies will glow as the membrane reflects the light to the platform. From a distance they will appear as sculptural lanterns and welcoming beacons to the station. 

DAY2 Final.jpg 
 
The aerodynamic shape of each canopy fans out to form light, wave like rhythms that flow across the two platforms.  A rhythmic line runs along the edges of the canopies as they swoop and curve, creating a fluid and energetic experience for waiting passengers. 
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 Under each canopy is a curved bench that follows the contours of the curved blue glass windscreen.  The curved windscreens and seating are part of the ‘arcing’ station vocabulary.  The platforms will be a luminous plane of blue glass aggregate, creating a dynamic, light activated surface and a dramatic contrast to the white shelters and benches. These field of blues reference the sky by day and at night change character as the blues catch the artificial light and darken.
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Artist Bios

Frequent collaborators and husband and wife Anna Valentina Murch (d. 2014) and Douglas Hollis joined forces to conceive of the design for the signature station at Ninth Street. Murch, a sculptor whose work emphasized the environment, completed over 15 public art projects throughout the United States and won awards both from the Public Art Network and the National Endowment for the Arts. Hollis has been exploring natural phenomena like sound, climate, and wind since he began working in the early 1970s. His public art commissions total to more than thirty projects and his work is included in the collections of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.