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About

Central Piedmont Community College Stop 

Nestled near the banks of the Little Sugar Creek, Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) is the largest community college in North Carolina with six campuses throughout Charlotte.  The main campus centers around a building on the corner of Trade Street and Kings Drive which formerly housed Charlotte College (now UNC Charlotte) and prior to that, Central High School (CHS).

These windscreen designs focus on themes of education, aspirations, and development along Little Sugar Creek and how it has impacted natural resources.  The outbound stop design features materials about CPCC and its history, with images of CPCC and Central High School.  There are photos of ordinary events and examples of extraordinary people and high achievers, all of whom showed perseverance. The inbound stop focuses primarily on the preservation of Little Sugar Creek and important moments in the city's past that occurred nearby. 

 

CPCC Outbound Windscreen Key
(click on the image for a closer view)

1. Contour map of Little Sugar Creek area from U.S. Geological Survey. Map courtesy of Phil Bradley, a Piedmont Geologist at NC Geological Survey.

2&3. Pages of handwritten mathematical computations and chemistry notes selected not only for graphic interest, but also because they refer to Charlotte education pioneer Bonnie Cone, who first taught math and science. The mathematics notes were supplied by Kim Jovanovich, University of New Orleans Dean and professor, and are typical of high school subject matter. The chemistry notes are courtesy of Noemi Jesalva, professor at CPCC.

4. Postcard of Central High School (C.H.S.) circa 1925. Located on Elizabeth Avenue at Kings Drive, the building is now part of the campus of Central Piedmont Community College. Courtesy of Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.
 
5. WWII ration stamps.  The ration stamps were assembled into booklets and distributed at Central High School, which also housed the Charlotte Center, the night school that served WWII veterans going to classes on the GI Bill.Courtesy of Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.
 
6. Central High School women’s basketball team during the early 20th Century. Photo courtesy of Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.
 
7. Central High School Commencement Program. Courtesy of Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.
 
8. Photo of former Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Elmer Garinger.  As C.H.S. Principal, he was the person who first hired Bonnie Cone to teach math, and who later encouraged her to become Director of the Charlotte Center of the University of North Carolina. The Charlotte Center later became Charlotte College, and eventually the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Photo courtesy of Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.
 
9. Bonnie Cone, the spirited and dynamic force in the development of higher education in Charlotte, was one of the most important educational leaders in the city's and state’s history. Photo courtesy of the Bonnie E. Cone Papers (MSS 112), Special Collections, J. Murrey Atkins Library, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
 
10. Charlotte College marquee at Central High School. Photo courtesy of the Bonnie E. Cone Papers (MSS 112), Special Collections, J. Murrey Atkins Library, University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
 
11. “Slowly but Surely in North Carolina,” Jan 14, 1963. This article is about the end to segregation in the city’s public schools, and highlights Gus Roberts, who was the first African American student to attend C.H.S. James K. Batten, byline. Courtesy of the Charlotte Observer.​
 
12. Gus Roberts’ graduation from Central High School, June 1st, 1959. Roberts was the first African American student to graduate from CHS. Photo courtesy of the Charlotte Observer.
 
13. Old Central High School marching band. Photo courtesy of the Charlotte Observer.
 
14. Illustration of Great Blue Heron, by Mark Catesby in “The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands”. There are many reported sightings of the Great Blue Heron in and around Little Sugar Creek. Images from the book used here are courtesy of the Rare Books and Special Collections at the Ernest F. Hollings Special Collections Library, University of South Carolina.
 
15. 1987 CPCC Commencement photo courtesy of Central Piedmont Community College Archives. Katie Causier Howell, CPCC Archivist.
 
16. 1974 postcard of the Richard H. Hagemeyer Learning Resource Center at CPCC. Courtesy of Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.
 
17. Photo of students on front of steps of Central High School on January 1, 1957. Photo Courtesy of the Charlotte Observer.  
 
18. CPCC time capsule photo. . In 1988 CPCC buried a time capsule to commemorate its 25th Anniversary. Uncovered in 2013, the capsule contained nearly 80 historic photos of the school and its history. Photo courtesy of Central Piedmont Community College Archives. Katie Causier Howell, CPCC Archivist.
 
19. Central Piedmont Community College Charter, establishing the college in 1963. Courtesy of Central Piedmont Community College Archives.
 
20. “Aspire” statue by New York artist Greg Wyatt, 2005. Photo courtesy by Central Piedmont Community College.

CPCC Inbound Windscreen Key
(click on the image for a closer view)
  ​
1&2.  Background maps are US Geological Survey contour maps of the Little Sugar Creek area, alternated with a detail from “A Compleat map of North-Carolina from an actual survey”. Published in 1770, this map includes Native American territories. Courtesy of the digital map collection at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.

3&4. Great Blue Heron and frontispiece. A naturalist from England, Mark Catesby created the first color plate book of American flora and fauna, “The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands.” He began the drawings in 1712 and spent the rest of his life writing and illustrating this self-published, two-volume masterpiece about the plants and animals of the New World.

5. Urban map of Little Sugar Creek Greenway project. Courtesy of Scott Black, GIS Analyst for Mecklenburg County GIS, Mapping & Project Services Division.
 
6. Illustration of bullfrog by Mark Catesby.  

7. Trolley bound for Elizabeth, indicated by the sign in the window. Photo courtesy of the Charlotte Trolley Museum.
 
8. Re-inactment photo of a drum of orange blossom deodorant over Little Sugar Creek. In the 1960's, in response to complaints from citizens, the Mecklenburg County Health Department hung 55 gallon drums of orange blossom deodorant from bridges along the creek, allowing the liquid to drip ino the creeks to mask the odors. Unfortunately, this effort was unsuccessful. Collection of Rusty Rozzelle.
 
9. Joggers on Little Sugar Creek Greenway, July, 2012. Photo courtesy of the Charlotte Observer.
 
10. Bicyclist on Little Sugar Creek Greenway, July, 2012. Photo courtesy of the Charlotte Observer.
 
11. Map showing Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services stream restoration project along Little Sugar Creek. Developed based on an earlier map showing most of the upper Little Sugar Creek watershed. Designer, Brian G. Sikes, Project Manager, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services. Photo courtesy of Meredith S. Moore, Senior Environmental Specialist, Charlotte Mecklenburg Storm Water Services.
 
12. Front page of Charlotte Observer, September 11, 1936. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s visit to Charlotte while on the campaign trail. Photo courtesy of the Charlotte Observer and Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.
 
13. Cover from Green Pastures Rally, where President Roosevelt spoke on September 10, 1936.  Courtesy of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.
 
14. Federation Cottage at Thompson Orphanage,  located near Little Sugar Creek. The bricks were made of mud from the creek bottom. Courtesy of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.
 
15. Children at Thompson Orphanage. The Memorial Chapel of St. Mary the Virgin that stands between Third Street, Fourth Street and Kings Drive and is surrounded by large oak trees. It is the oldest remaining building of Thompson Orphanage and Training Institution. Founded in 1887, Thompson is the third oldest orphanage in North Carolina. Photo courtesy of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.
 
16. Building the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. The memorial is located in Thompson Park between Third and Fourth Streets and was dedicated on November 11, 1989. Permission to use given by the Mecklenburg County Vietnam Veterans Memorial Committee, represented by William H. Guerrant.
 
17. Circa 1940 postcard of the newly opened Memorial Stadium and Armory where FDR spoke during the Green Pastures Rally in 1936.  Courtesy of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.
 
18. Great Blue Heron with descriptive text, Mark Catesby.
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