Bus
Rail
Para-transit
Fares
Alerts
Commuting
Newsroom
Transit Planning
About
Davidson Street Stop
 
The elected officials and staff who make up our municipal government and service agencies work tirelessly to continue to keep Charlotte moving forward. Highlighting these efforts, the outbound shelter focuses primarily on the courts and city government while the inbound shelter honors the work of the Charlotte’s Police Officers, Firemen, and EMTs.​ In the center of each windscreen are two images that create a comparison for the viewer: a 1918 panorama of the city (tinted yellow here) overlayed with a black and white image of the City's current skyline. Many Charlotteans feel a sense of pride about because the magnificent skyline because it demonstrates hard work and progress. The artist wants us to remember that this growth is partly thanks to the work of city officials and workers.
 

 

 Davidson Street Outbound Windsreen Key

(click on the image for a closer view)​

 
1. Handwritten city election returns from Charlotte's Second Ward, May 6, 1901. Courtesy of Charlotte (N.C.) City Records (MSS 127), Special Collections, J. Murrey Atkins Library, University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
 
2. Centennial map of Charlotte from 1875, showing the four wards of Uptown Charlotte. Courtesy of the State Archives of North Carolina.  
 
3. 1918 birds-eye view of Charlotte looking north toward Camp Greene by Charlottean George Doumar. Library of Congress.
 
4. Charlotte skyline at dusk. Photo copyright Roger Ball, Charlotte, NC.
 
5. Hornets' nest etching. The hornet's nest symbol has been associated with the City of Charlotte since the revolutionary war when British commander George Cornwallis was driven out by residents, calling our city a "hornet's nest of rebellion." Today you can find this symbol in the official seal of the city of Charlotte as well as on the uniforms of our police officers and fire fighters. Courtesy of Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.  
 
6. A 1928 postcard of the 5th Mecklenburg County Courthouse, located at 700 East Trade Street. Since 1766 Charlotte has had eight different courthouse buildings throughout the city. This one was opened in 1928 and housed the courts until 1978. The text on this postcard reads "Mecklenburg County New Million Dollar Courthouse N.C.-49." It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979 and now houses the District Attorney's office. Courtesy of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.
 
7.  The 8th Mecklenburg County Courthouse as it stands today on the corner of McDowell and 4th Streets. The building was opened in 2007 after 10 years of planning and 3 years of construction. Photo courtesy of Charles Keller, Jr., Community Access and Outreach Administrator, 26th Judicial District of NC.
 
8. Judge’s bench, gavel, American flag and NC State flag. Photo courtesy of Charles Keller, Jr., Community Access and Outreach Administrator, 26th Judicial District of NC.
 
9. Civil Rights Protestor.  His sign reads, "Onward to Justice. Down with Injustice. Liberty and Justice for All." Photo courtesy of Levine Museum of the New South.
 
10. 4th Mecklenburg County Courthouse featuring a large open portico surmounted by a round dome. The courts were housed here from 1897-1928. Photo courtesy of Charles Keller, Jr., Community Access and Outreach Administrator, 26th Judicial District of NC.
 
11. Photo of Gandhi statue in front of 5th Mecklenburg County courthouse. Artist's own photo.
 
12. Handwritten city election returns from Charlotte's Fourth Ward, May 6, 1901. Courtesy of Charlotte (N.C.) City Records (MSS 127), Special Collections, J. Murrey Atkins Library, University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
 
13. 46th Annual Carrousel Parade of law enforcement officers, November 26, 1993. Photo by Bob Leverone, courtesy of the Charlotte Observer.  
 
14. Strips from a Geographic Information System (GIS) map of the City of Charlotte voting districts, as of 2013. Image courtesy of Jamie Metz, GIS Analyst, Mecklenburg County.
 
15. Charlotte's current Federal Reserve building as it stands today at the corner of Trade and Davidson Streets. Due to the early American goldrush in the area, Charlotte was home to one of the first branches of the federal mint for the coinage of gold. The first building opened in 1837 and now houses the Mint Museum of Art.   Artist's own photo.
 
16. Federal Reserve graphs. Approved for use by Matthew Martin, Regional Executive, with assistance from Wanda Maynor Carter, Executive Support, District Outreach, The Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, Charlotte Branch.
 
17. Shredded money. Stock photo, Lou Oates Photography.
 
18. Handwritten city election returns from Charlotte's First Ward, May 6, 1901. Courtesy of Charlotte (N.C.) City Records (MSS 127), Special Collections, J. Murrey Atkins Library, University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
 
19. Handwritten city election returns from Charlotte's Third Ward, May 6, 1901. Courtesy of Charlotte (N.C.) City Records (MSS 127), Special Collections, J. Murrey Atkins Library, University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
 
20. The new Government Center building with a view of Marshall Park. Photo courtesy of Jane Faircloth.
 
21. Postcard of old City Hall. Opened in 1925, the Old City Hall, along with its neighbor, the "Million Dollar Courthouse" is one of the few historic buildings that remain in Center City Charlotte. Courtesy of Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.  

 

 
Davidson Street Inbound Windscreen Key​
(click on the image for a closer view)
 
1. Details from two GIS maps of uptown police districts. Used with permission from Sharon Clark and her supervisors, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department (CMPD), mapmaker.
 
2. Centennial map of Charlotte from 1875, showing the four center city wards. Courtesy of the State Archives of North Carolina.
 
3.
1918 birds-eye view of Charlotte looking north toward Camp Greene by Charlottean George Doumar
. Library of Congress.
 
4. Charlotte skyline in daytime. Photo copyright Roger Ball, Charlotte, NC.
 
5. Hornets' nest etching. Courtesy of Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.
 
6. Photo of the original Neptune Fire Engine, taken when the wagon was brought back to Charlotte.  The Neptune Company men were some of the earliest African American firefighters.  The manuscript is a receipt for repairs made on the original Neptune fire engine. Captain Robert Brisley CMFD. All of the material on the Neptune Company was provided with the assistance of Tom Link, Battalion Chief, Charlotte Fire Department.
 
7. & 8. Portraits of Lt. Col. CSLA Taylor and 2nd Lt. Gray J. Toole in their Spanish American War uniforms.  These men were members of the Neptune Company. Fair use image, from combined sources, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Fire Department (CMFD), and Special Collections Archive at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
 
9. Firefighter Jeff Clark, being thanked by "Cinnamon," a doberman rescued from a house fire in July 1999. Photo by Patrick Schneider, courtesy of the Charlotte Observer.
 
10. Recent photo of hose truck with firefighters. Photo courtesy of CMFD Capt. Robert Brisley.
 
11. Recent photo of firefighter and burning building. Photo courtesy of CMFD Capt. Robert Brisley.
 
12. EMTs at work. Photo courtesy of CMFD Capt. Robert Brisley.
 
13. Historic fire truck and firefighters. Photo courtesy of CMFD Capt. Robert Brisley.
 
14. Historic photo of Charlotte’s eight policemen, circa 1880s. Photo courtesy of Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.
 
15. First African American female police officer being sworn in, circa 1970. Photo courtesy of the Charlotte Observer.
 
16. Police memorial service dedicating a monument to Charlotte-Mecklenburg officers who have died in the line of duty, November 9, 1997. Kent. D. Johnson byline. Photo courtesy of the Charlotte Observer.
 
17. Policeman with child who is carrying newspapers.  Photo courtesy of the Charlotte Observer.
 
18. Historic photo of female meter readers straightening the seams in their nylon stockings in October, 1950. The eleven members of the meter check squad are Edna Royce, Mary Holder, Mary Massey, Miriam Miller, Frances Plummer, Catherine Nelson, Mildred Fierens, Dot Royce, Edna Worley, Lorraine Montgomery and Sue Prophet. Being checked by Traffic Capt. Lloyd Henkel and Lib Steele. Photo courtesy of the Charlotte Observer
 
19. First African American men to be given full Civil Service status, 1947. Photo by Colin Edwards, courtesy of the Booton Family.
 
20. Bicycle Police Officers, on duty at the Democratic National Convention in September 2012. Photo courtesy of the Charlotte Observer.

​ ​​