Bus
Rail
Para-transit
Fares
Alerts
Commuting
Newsroom
Transit Planning
About

 Elizabeth and Hawthorne Stop 

The Elizabeth and Hawthorne stop will be located in the heart of the Elizabeth neighborhood business district. In her research of this historic streetcar suburb, the the artist was impressed by the ways locals had made a national impact and also by the landmarks that are considered neighborhood institutions. O'Neil chose these people and places to be the subjects of her art because they are interwoven into the fabric of daily life in Elizabeth.

Also impressive to the artist were the streets of Elizabeth, lined with majestic willow oaks, and by the current residents who take great pride in preserving the tree canopy. Many of these trees are over one hundred years old, planted during the early development of residential neighborhoods. To recognize this, the artist has selected an 1801 botanical illustration of a willow oak branch as a unifying design element in the art.

 

Elizabeth and Hawthorne Outbound Windscreen Key
(click on the image for a closer view)

 

1.1929 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map showing Travis and Elizabeth Avenues. These highly detailed maps were originally created for assessing fire insurance liability in urbanized areas, but now serve as a very accurate record of past building locations.

2. In the background is an illustration of a willow oak branch. Willow oaks line the street of both the Elizabeth neighborhood and many others throughout Charlotte. Image from "L'histoire des chenes d l’Amerique" by Andre Michaux, published in 1801.
 
3. Handwritten page of sheet music in reference to Hal Kemp, pictured in image 14. Hal Kemp grew up in Elizabeth and went on to become a nationally renowned composer and Big Band Leader in the 1930's. Music courtesy of Kim Jovanovich, New Orleans, LA.
 
4. Masthead from The Carolina Israelite, including local address.  Writer and Civil Rights activist Harry Golden, who lived in Charlotte, self published, sold advertisements, wrote articles for and distributed The Carolina Israelite newsletter from 1942- 1968. He built an international circulation of 300,000, becoming a voice for those oppressed because of race, religion, or economic status. Courtesy of Special Collections, J. Murrey Atkins Library, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Harry Golden Papers (MSS 20).  Used with permission from Richard Goldhurst.
 
5. Photograph of Harry Golden with John F. Kennedy.  Golden was a supporter of JFK’s campaign and also authored a book on the president’s support of the Civil Rights movement titled "Mr. Kennedy and the Negroes," published in 1964. Courtesy of Special Collections, J. Murrey Atkins Library, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Harry Golden Papers (MSS 20).  Used with permission from Richard Goldhurst.
 
6. Photograph of the Elizabeth tree canopy. Photo courtesy of Ken Magas, Elizabeth Neighborhood Association.
 
7. Harry Golden and Anita Stewart Brown in front of the house at 1701 E. 8th Street at the corner of Hawthorne Lane. Mr. Golden first moved to the Elizabeth neighborhood in 1952, and when his home on Elizabeth Avenue was slated for demolition in 1973, longtime friend Anita Stewart Brown offered him this residence. He stayed here until his death in 1981. After his passing, Ms. Brown made efforts to preserve Mr. Golden's belongings, apart from his personal papers, which were donated to the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Photo copyright Tom E. Walters. Harry Golden Papers (MSS 20), Special Collections, J. Murrey Atkins Library, University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

8. Harry Golden at his desk. Photo courtesy of Tom Hanchett, Levine Museum of the New South. Used with permission from Richard Goldhurst.

9. Harry Golden with his close friend, the poet Carl Sandburg. Golden wrote a biography of Sandburg, titled "Carl Sandburg," that was published in 1961. Photo courtesy of Charlotte Observer. Used with permission from Richard Goldhurst and the Carl Sandburg Family Trust.

10. The manuscript in the background is an article from the Carolina Israelite, July-August 1965. It is an excerpt from Golden’s speech at Salem College in Winston-Salem, NC on July 20, 1965. Harry Golden Papers (MSS 20), Special Collections, J. Murrey Atkins Library, University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Used with permission from Richard Goldhurst.
 
11. Envelope with Hal Kemp’s family address in the Elizabeth neighborhood. Courtesy of Special Collections at Wilson Library at UNC Chapel Hill. Used with permission from the family of Hal Kemp.

12.  1938 photo of last trolley run, on Travis in front of the Visulite Theatre.  The car in this image, #85, was built in the Dilworth Trolley Barn in 1927 and now resides in the Charlotte Trolley Museum. Courtesy of Special Collections, J. Murrey  Atkins Library (in the Myers Park Homeowners Association Records), University of North Carolina at Charlotte

13. Trolley Walk on Greenway. Photo courtesy of Ken Magas, Elizabeth Neighborhood Association.
 
14. Photo of Hal Kemp as a bandleader. Kemp's orchestra broadcast regularly over radio and appeared in movies. Courtesy of Special Collections at Wilson Library at UNC Chapel Hill. Used with permission from the family of Hal Kemp.

15. Handwritten letter by Hal Kemp to his family announcing his marriage. Kemp was married to Bessie Slaughter from 1932-1938 and Martha Stephenson Kemp from 1939 to his death in 1940. Courtesy of Special Collections at Wilson Library at UNC Chapel Hill. Used with permission from the family of Hal Kemp.

16. Poster advertising a Hal Kemp concert. The poster reads: “The show world’s most distinctive musical entertainers… Hal Kemp with his famous orchestra and lilting musical revue… Judy Starr and her tantalizing songs.” Courtesy of Special Collections at Wilson Library at UNC Chapel Hill. Used with permission from the family of Hal Kemp.

 

Elizabeth and Hawthorne Inbound Windscreen Key
(click on the image for a closer view)


1.1929 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map showing Travis and Elizabeth Avenues.

2. In the background is an illustration of a willow oak branch. Willow oaks line the street of both the Elizabeth neighborhood and many others throughout Charlotte. This illustration is from "L'histoire des chenes d l’Amerique" by Andre Michaux published in 1801.
 
3. Handwritten page of sheet music in reference to Hal Kemp, pictured in image 14 of the outboud shelter. Hal Kemp grew up in Elizabeth and went on to be a nationally renowned composer and Big Band Leader in the 1930's. Music courtesy of Kim Jovanovich, New Orleans, LA.
 
4. Show calendar from the Double Door Inn, a Charlotte institution for blues, reggae and zydeco music since 1973. Courtesy of Charlotte music photographer Daniel Coston.
 
5. Iconic sign of the Double Door Inn on Charlottetowne Avenue. Courtesy of Daniel Coston.

6. Performance by guitarist Peter Case at the Double Door Inn. Courtesy of Daniel Coston, used with permission of Peter Case.
 
7. Image of the Visulite Theatre on Elizabeth Avenue near the intersection with Hawthorne. The Visulite is one of Charlotte's premier locations for contemporary live music. . Courtesy of Daniel Coston.
 
8. Elizabeth Avenue Farmer’s Market, where neighborhood residents go to buy fresh, local products and foods.  Photo courtesy of Ken Magas, Elizabeth Neighborhood Association.
 
9. Elizabeth Traditional School, which celebrated 100 years of educational service in 2012. Photo courtesy of Mitch Timko.
 
10. Elizabeth Traditional School Students, circa 1918. Photo Courtesy of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.
 
11. Cursive Writing, traditionally taught in elementary school.

12. One of the historic homes still standing in Elizabeth, the R.C. Biberstein House, built in 1906.  Mr. Biberstein, who designed and owned the home originally, was a noted architect of textile mills. Courtesy of Tom Hanchett, Levine Museum of the New South
 
13.­­­ Anderson’s Restaurant, a family owned and operated restaurant on Elizabeth Avenue from 1946-2007.  Photo Courtesy of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library.
 
14.  A slice of the “World’s Best Pecan Pie” from Anderson’s Restaurant. Photo courtesy of Rick Hovis.
 
15.  Arhelger Memorial in Independence Park under a blanket of snow.  This memorial was built to honor Lillian Arhelger, a Central High School Teacher who sacrificed herself to rescue a student from drowning in 1931. Photo courtesy of Robert Brandon III.
​​