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2002 News from Mecklenburg County


November 7, 2002


MARKER PRESERVES A PLACE IN HISTORY FOR THE COUNTY'S FIRST AFRICAN AMERICAN HOSPITAL

 

Good Samaritan Hospital

Charlotte, NC — The Charlotte Mecklenburg Historic Landmarks Commission will dedicate a historical marker Tuesday, November 12, in remembrance of Good Samaritan Hospital, the County's first privately funded hospital built exclusively for the treatment of African Americans.

Good Samaritan was built on Hill Street between Mint and Graham with private funds raised by women members of St. Peter's Episcopal Church, who saw a need for a place for both spiritual and physical healing for blacks in the post civil war South. It opened its doors in 1891 and remained a functioning hospital until 1982. The building was demolished in 1996 to make room for Ericsson Stadium.

Dan Morrill, director of the Historic Landmarks Commission, says Good Samaritan Hospital is an important example of the significant role that women and the church played in Mecklenburg County's history.

"St. Peter's Church has a rich history of identifying people in need and creating programs and services to meet those needs," Morrill says.  Between 1882 and 1891, the Ladies' Aid Society of St. Peter's raised $700 for the lot and $4,400 for the building itself by reaching out to friends and philanthropists from Charlotte to New York.

In addition to the marker on the grounds directly across from Ericsson Stadium, there is a permanent display featuring the actual chapel from Good Samaritan at the Levine Museum of the New South in Charlotte. For more information about Good Samaritan Hospital and all the Historic Landmarks Commission projects, go to www.cmhpf.org.



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