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2003 News from Mecklenburg County

March 20, 2003

TALKING TRASH: MECKLENBURG COUNTY
SEEKS PUBLIC INPUT ON RECYCLING, WASTE REDUCTION

Charlotte, NC - When you throw something out, where does it go?   Mecklenburg County encourages you to recycle as much as possible - bottles, cans, newspapers, etc. The rest usually goes to a landfill.  But since our community is growing so fast, space is limited and the county must follow a plan to reduce waste and preserve our natural resources.

Mecklenburg County is currently in the process of updating its 10-Year Solid Waste Management Plan, as required by the state of North Carolina.  The process includes the opportunity for county residents and businesses to participate and provide feedback.  There are a couple of ways to participate:

· Public meetings: All begin at 7 p.m.

Monday, March 24:
West Boulevard Branch Library, 2157 West Boulevard

Thursday, March 27:
Huntersville Town Hall, 101 Huntersville-Concord Road

Monday, March 31:
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Government Center, Room 267, 600 East Fourth Street

Thursday, April 3:
Mint Hill Town Hall, 7151 Matthews-Mint Hill Road

Monday, April 7: 
Belle Johnston Community Center, 1000 Johnston Road, Pineville

· Via the Internet: Visit www.wipeoutwaste.com, review the current 10-Year Solid Waste Management Plan and submit a message via e-mail.

The long-term goals of the 10-Year Solid Waste Management Plan call for reducing the amount of waste per person that is deposited into landfills and reducing the litter on our public thoroughfares. The North Carolina Solid Waste Management Act of 1989 requires all local governments to develop a comprehensive solid waste management plan, anticipating the needs of the community for the next 10 years. 

Mecklenburg County's first comprehensive Solid Waste Management Plan was developed and adopted in 1988. Recognizing that change occurs, and that the local government's solid waste management plan needs to be a living document, the plan must be updated every three years. The County last updated its plan in August 2000 and is now in the process of updating the plan for 2003.



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